Archive for September, 2012

Quick Chess Puzzles: Checkmates in Two

How many of these checkmates-in-two can you solve in three minutes? All puzzles have White to play and checkmate in two. Have fun solving.
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Quick Chess Puzzle: White Checkmates in Two?

Here’s a quick chess puzzle. Can White checkmate in two moves?

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Women’s Chess Endgame (Antoaneta-Humpy 0-1) Spot Black’s Winning Strategy

After White's 32.b4, what's Black's simple strategy to win?

Here’s a position from Round 3 at the Women’s Chess Grand Prix. Former women’s world chess champion Antoaneta Stefanova was cruising along in a better position after the opening against former world title challenger Koneru Humpy. Then, she goofed up in the endgame. In the position on the left, can you work out the strategy for Black to win? Run the full game in the Chess King applet.
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Women’s Chess Grand Prix R2 in Ankara: Betul Yildiz Upsets Viktorija Cmilyte

This is an interesting upset game from Round 2 at the sixth and last edition of the Women’s Chess Grand Prix 2011/12. Viktoria Cmilyte – Betul Yildiz 0-1. You can read the report of the second round at Chess Blog. Here are the players’ comments: Viktorija Cmilyte: The position we got in the opening is quite known. Just I think b3 was not accurate as f5 is a good move and I don’t have Qb3 anymore. I don’t think that g4 is a good move but my position was ok after until I started to play badly. Ne2 was a bad move because after Bd6 black has many threats and it’s very difficult to defend. Betul Yildiz: I thought white could have defended more precisely in one moment. Maybe that could have tried 24.Bh7 and 25.e4 instead of 24. Bf3.

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Cool Chess Puzzles: Sam Loyd Prize-Winners!

Sam Loyd, 1885

Time for some classical chess puzzles. The first one is on the left and the second in the extended post. White to play and checkmate in three in both the chess puzzles.
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Women’s Chess Grand Prix R1: Socko Pushes Drawn Endgame and Loses to Cmilyte

White resigns at this position. Can you win it for Black from here?

Women’s chess is fighting chess – say a lot of people! It’s pretty true if you consider how many women’s chess games at Grand Prix events go right down to the last drop of blood. Here’s once such game from the first round of the sixth edition of the Women’s Chess Grand Prix that’s just begun in Ankara (Round 1 report on Chess Blog). Monika Socko pushes a game against Viktorija Cmilyte and ends up in a lost position. Can you play the endgame after White resigned and win? Yes, it’s the Lucena position again! Learn those endgames.
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Women’s Chess Grand Prix R1: Humpy Uses Rare Sicilian Line to Beat Yildiz

Ankara Women's Chess Grand Prix R1: Humpy shows win over Yildiz

The women’s chess grand prix has begun in Ankara, Turkey. This is the sixth edition of the 2011-12 cycle of the grand prix and you can read a full report of Round 1 at Chess Blog. Here is a nice game in which former world title challenger Koneru Humpy used a less-played line of the Sicilian defense to break through Betul Yildiz’s defenses. Humpy first one a crucial pawn on the Queenside and then used a Knight-tango to leave White with a lost endgame. Enjoy the game in our super Chess King applet.
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Simple Chess Endgame: Is this Win or Draw for White?

Don’t let your opponent escape with a draw when a win is possible! In the position on the left, can White play and win? Or, it’s going to be a draw? You can find hundreds of such great chess puzzles and positions to improve your game in the Chess Killer Tips podcast video database. All the chess videos are hosted by Chess Queen™ Alexandra Kosteniuk – the 12th Women’s World Chess Champion!

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Powerful Chess Game: Carlsen-Anand 0-1 in Amber Blindfold

31.Rd2 played by Carlsen. What is Anand's strategy for a win?

The best part about training with Chess King is that you can access all the chess games played by the world’s best chess players. You can use Chess King to prepare against any opponent in a tournament. We found this nice game using the search feature in Chess King. The game was Magnus Carlsen-Viswanathan Anand 0-1 Amber Blindfold in March, 2011. Not only does it show how precise top grandmasters play without sight of the board, but a small error has them pounce right upon their opponent with no mercy. Carlsen has just played Rd2 in the position on the left. Can you figure out Anand’s strategy as Black for a win?

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Winning Chess Patterns: Visualize First, Calculate Later

Position 1:Black to play and win

Often, chess is less about calculations and more about intuition and the pattern of checkmate. World’s best grandmasters spot patterns easily and then set out calculating candidate moves. Here are two positions to test how quickly you can calculate in the right direction. In the position on the left, Black to play and get a win. In the second position, it is White to play and win.

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Difficult Chess Endgame: Can White Checkmate in Four?

White to play and checkmate in four!

Time to solve a nice tactical chess puzzle. Of course, White is material up and it’s a win for sure. Can you find out how White can win this position by checkmate in four? Find the answer in the Chess King applet in the extended post.
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Chess Queen Alexandra comments Kosteniuk – Soumya from the Istanbul Olympiads

Chess Queen Alexandra Kosteniuk plays Swaminathan Soumya at the Istanbul Chess OlympiadsToday we are presenting an important game from the 9th round of the women’s Chess Olympiads in Istanbul 2012, between Chess Queen™ Alexandra Kosteniuk and Swaminathan Soumya of India. The game is commented by Alexandra below. This game allowed the Russian team to win that match 3-1 and to go on to win the event. Read Alexandra’s post about the Istanbul Chess Olympiads here. The applet below is automatically generated from the chess software “Chess King” (use code “INTROKING50″ on checkout for a $50 discount).

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Cool Chess Middlegame Puzzle: Can You Beat Fischer?

What's White's winning strategy?

Fischer was not ‘Fischer’ when he began playing chess. His chess was human enough and weak enough before he became the ‘immortal’ Fischer that he was. Despite that, a Fischer-loss is bigtime for chess fans! Here’s a position from the game Andrade Jauregui-Bobby Fischer 1-0 dating to Santiago, 1959. Fischer was young and learning. Can you see the strategy that helped White win? Black has just played 24. …d5.

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Cool Chess Show: Radoslaw Wojtaszek-Hikaru Nakamura 1-0 With Basic Chess Strategy!

Nakamura chooses to resign: There's no stopping those extra pawns! Replay the full game in the Chess King applet.

A very interesting game in which Radoslaw Wojtaszek beat Hikaru Nakamura using lots of threats, a subtle and strong attack, plus piece co-ordiation during the last round at the 40th Chess Olympiad in Istanbul. (Read report on Chess Blog.) White exploits the power of a pawn clamped down on h6 with the dark-squared Bishop missing from Black’s fianchetto. Overall, of course, Radoslaw played safe leaving out interesting tactics. But then, White was plus for a long time and just needed to build on that advantage to win the game. Watch out for some nice moves like 20.Nh4, 40.h6.

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Spot Magic Move in Kosteniuk-Yanjindulam at 40th Istanbul Chess Olympiad 2012

Spot White's Magic Move! Black has just played 32.Bf8

Chess Queen™ Alexandra Kosteniuk’s Russian team has won the gold for the second time at the Chess Olympiad. The 40th edition of the super team tournament concluded in Istanbul on Sunday. You can read reports and blog post by 12th Women’s World Chess Champion Alexandra Kosteniuk at www.chessqueen.com. Here is a position from Kosteniuk-Yanjindulam played in Round 3 at the 40th Chess Olympiad in Istanbul. White is positionlly better. Can you spot the strong magic move that will win the game?
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Istanbul Chess Olympiad Round 10: Why Wang Hao Resigned Against Vassily Ivanchuk?

Black has just played 21. ...f6 How should White win this?

The 40th Chess Olympiad in Istanbul went right down to the wire. In the overall results, Ukraine’s victory over China in the last round was crucial. Here is the Vassily Ivanchuk-Wang Hao 1-0 chess game from the top board. Read the full report on Armenia and Russia winning the Chess Olympiad in the men and women’s section at Chess Blog. In the position on the left, Black has just played the blunder 21. …f6. How should White win this from here? Does White really need to save that Knight?

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Istanbul Chess Olympiad Round 10: Akopian’s Cool Knight Sac Destroys Sokolov

You must value all your chess pieces for what they are in a specific position. How many pawns is worth a minor piece? Black chose a stunning Knight sacrifice with 19… Nxd4 picking up a basket of pawns! The rest of the game was one idea: Destroy with a pawn roll! Chess King Showcase: Sokolov versus Akopian during Round 10 at the 40th Chess Olympiad in Istanbul. Of course, Houdini would say it’s still a draw after the Knight sac, but we are talking human chess here. Read the round report on Chess Blog and run the game right here in the super Chess King applet.

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Istanbul Chess Olympiad Round 10: Think Like Aronian, Beat Giri

In the position on the left, Anish Giri has just played 33.Nd5 forking the Black Rooks. Black actually already has a plus, but from now on it’s sheer technique and a clear-cut killer winning plan. Don’t worry about calculating all the next 10 moves, just spot the magic move here and the right rough plan for Black! Replay the full game with Chess King. Read the Round 10 report from the 40th Chess Olympiad on Chess Blog.

If Black tries to save Rbc6, it’s a draw and if Black tries Rfc6, it’s even a win for White!

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Istanbul Chess Olympiad R10: Can You Draw This Position?

After 55.g5 Draw this position as Black!

Chess King Saturday Puzzle is here again. Chess is a lot about nerves, reacting on the spot, time pressure and psychology. Hard work and preparation is vital, but if you are unable to “play out” your knowledge, even the easiest of endgames are lost. Here is one such sad chess position from the Ding Liren-Alexander Onischuk game from the tenth round at the 40th Chess Olympiad in Istanbul. White has just pushed the pawn with 55.g5. How can Black draw endgame? Onischuk lost this game giving the Chinese a match win. Read the full Round 10 report at Chess Blog.

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Istanbul Chess Olympiad Round 9: Can You Spot Nakamura’s Idea to Beat Kramnik?

Nakamura-Kramnik: What happens if White plays 62.c8=Q?

It was the game of Round 9 as Hikaru Nakamura of the US stunned Vladimir Kramnik of Russia to push Russia off the sole lead at the 40th Chess Olympiad in Istanbul. Black went for a Rook sac, a pawn roll down the center, and a King march, but Nakamura was unstoppable because the compensation was not enough for Black. At one point it did seem Black could claw back a draw. However, it was not to be. White even underpromoted to win! Can you see in the diagram on the left and figure out what happens if White plays 62.c8=Q? Check your answer with the Chess King applet and Houdini analysis. You can also replay the full game between the two powerful grandmasters in the Chess King board.

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